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Paris Café Culture

In October, 2024, I'll be in Paris talking about café culture with Classical Pursuits. One of our stops will be the Wepler. I love this old-school place for coffee, meals, and above all, conversation. Meet me in Paris! Discuss great literature, walk through atmospheric streets and spend time drinking, eating, and talking in fabulous historic cafés. For more information about the trip, visit Classical Pursuits.

 

Brooklyn-born, Henry Miller (1891 – 1980) lived around the corner from the Wepler for a while. He wrote QUIET DAYS IN CLICHY in 1940, when he’d returned unwillingly, to the US; this is from the 1st page of the book:


“At one corner of the Place Clichy is the Café Wepler, which was for a long period my favorite haunt. I have sat there inside and out at all times of the day in all kinds of weather. I knew it like a book. The faces of the waiters, the managers, the cashiers, the whores, the clientele, even the attendants in the lavatory, are engraved in my memory as if they were illustrations in a book which I read every day. I remember the first day I entered the Café Wepler, in the year 1928.”

 

Miller's good friend, the photographer Brassaï, said the title "Quiet Days in Clichy" was the most misleading he’d ever heard.... 

Brooklyn-born writer Henry Miller (1891 – 1980) lived around the corner from the Wepler for a while. And his book QUIET DAYS IN CLICHY starts here--this is from the first page: 
“At one corner of the Place Clichy is the Café Wepler, which was for a long period my favorite haunt. I have sat there inside and out at all times of the day in all kinds of weather. I knew it like a book. The faces of the waiters, the managers, the cashiers, the whores, the clientele, even the attendants in the lavatory, are engraved in my memory as if they were illustrations in a book which I read every day. I remember the first day I entered the Café Wepler, in the year 1928” His good friend, Hungarian/ Romanian Jewish photographer Brassai, said the title was the most misleading he’d ever heard. 

"Critical, darkly funny and painstakingly lyrical" - The Globe and Mail

"As if we're reading notes scribbled by the expatriate freelance writer in a car bouncing along a dirt road in Kenya, or on a late-night intercontinental flight... Pasold's work is the poetic equivalent of living out of a suitcase." - The Toronto Star

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